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Blake Class

Welcome to Blake Class!

 

Our class is made up of children of different ages and year groups across the school so it is unique! We have spaces for 12 children with speech and language needs and at present we have 9 children from Year R, Year 1, Year 3 , Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6. Our children also belong to their year group class so they can enjoy activities and friendships with their peers as well as benefit from the one-to-one and small group learning we provide in Blake Class.

 

Meet the Blake team!

 

Mrs S. Erkul  - Teacher

Mrs N. Watson - Higher Level Teaching Assistant

Mrs T. Simpson - Teaching Assistant

Ms L. Adams - Speech Therapist

Mrs Z. Swayne - Speech Therapist

 

 

Quentin Blake

 

 

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Our class is named after the well-known children's author and illustrator Quentin Blake. Blake first found fame illustrating Roald Dahl books before moving on to write his own children's story titles. This year we will be enjoying some of the hilarious Mrs Armitage books such as Mrs Armitage on Wheels, Mrs Armitage Queen of the Road and Mrs Armitage and the Big Wave, as well as some other classics such as Angelo and Mister Magnolia. Quentin Blake is now 84 years old, but is still producing new books and illustrations and appearing in exhibitions. Most recently he has published a collaboration with Michael Morpurgo called Didn't we have a lovely time!

 

NEWS UPDATE: Blake Class speech therapist Lucy Adams bumped into Quentin at Kings Cross station in London recently. She told him we have named our class in his honour and he was most impressed!

 

 

Family Learning Afternoon: December 2016

 

Blake Class family members were invited to a Family Learning session in December 2016 entitled Supporting Language through Books and Stories. We enjoyed exploring a range of books and resources and discussing strategies for supporting language. Parents had the opportunity to try these out with their children in Blake Class.

 

Below are some ideas and links to develop language through reading:

 

http://displays.tpet.co.uk/#/ViewResource/id875

http://www.booktrust.org.uk/resources/search/

http://www.booktrust.org.uk/programmes/primary/time-to-read/

 

Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies

Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 1
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 2
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 3
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 4
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 5
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 6
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 7
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 8
Family Learning afternoon December 2016: Reading Strategies 9

Family Learning Afternoon March 2017:

Memory Strategies

We held a Family Learning session on strategies to support memory. Parents attended a theory session on memory led by Miss Adams and Mrs Erkul and tried out some tasks to test their own memories! Parents then joined their children in Blake Class and enjoyed a range fun activities designed to develop memory skills in different ways.

 

Supporting Memory Powerpoint

How can we remember more easily?

 

Rehearsal

One way we can remember information is to repeat it, or rehearse it to ourselves. This can be in our heads or out loud. In this café role-play activity the waiter had to remember a customer's order without writing anything down, by rehearsing it. 

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Gesture

Another way to support memory is to use gesture and signs to represent meaning. In this activity, children and parents are memorising a poem using gestures.

 

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Visualisation

In this activity, the teacher described different figures in the pictures, naming type and colour of clothing. The children had to hold the information in their memory, then look at the pictures to work out which one had just been described. Often, many of us can remember better when we have a visual or picture to store alongside information in our heads. 

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